The Horse Thief Gravestone

This granite stone for the grave of a nameless horse thief is in the farthest corner of “New Sante Fe” cemetery on the Santa Fe Trail in Kansas City, Missouri. Did he die naturally, I wonder?

It’s a nice piece of granite, perhaps a scrap left over from the stone of a paying customer.

The Santa Fe, Oregon, and California national historic trails (NHTs) passed through “New Santa Fe” in the Kansas City, Missouri area. The Oregon and California trails provided pathways to the Pacific for fur traders, gold seekers, missionaries, and emigrants. The Santa Fe Trail was an international road for American and Mexican traders.

Teamsters created this route, driving heavy freight wagons to and from New Mexico. In the 1840s-50s, pioneer families traveled this part of the Santa Fe Trail as they started west to Oregon and California.

Beginning as a farm in 1933, New Santa Fe was a little post village situated on the west line of Missouri, on the Santa Fe Trail. Located a day’s
trip from Independence, wagon caravans laden with merchandise for the Mexican and California trade would stop here before pushing westward.

Located on the line between a free (Kansas) and a slave State (Missouri), New Santa Fe suffered from the Border War of 1855-60, the Civil War, and the depredations of the bands of outlaws who came after the war. Finally, the isolation of the village from the railroad reduced it to little more than an historic site.

This photograph is available as a postcard on Zazzle:

— 5.6″ x 4.25″ (landscape).
— Printed on ultra-heavyweight (120 lb.) card stock with a gloss finish.
— No minimum order.

 

This photo is also available as a print, poster, canvas print, metal print, greeting card and more from Fine Art America.  The Horse Thief Gravestone.Canvas Prints, Framed Prints, Acrylic Prints, Metal Prints, Posters, and More!

Photography Prints

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About Catherine Sherman

catherinesherman.wordpress.com
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